DIGITAL X-RAY

X-Ray (or Radiography) is a fast, painless, noninvasive scan that uses electromagnetic energy beams of radiation to produce detailed images of organs, tissues, bones, and other body structures. X-Rays are the oldest and most frequently used method of medical imaging. Mammograms, CT scans and dental imaging are some other common types of X-Rays.


As the rays pass through the body, different amounts of beams absorb depending on varying densities. The softer the tissue (such as blood, muscle, and fat), the darker gray it appears on the image. The denser the material (such as bones and metal), the whiter it appears. This is how a physician can quickly identify a fracture in a bone. As the beam passes through the fractured area, it appears as a dark line in an otherwise white bone. It is this understanding that allows physicians to quickly identify potential medical conditions. 

Digital x-ray machine

HOW TO PREPARE FOR AN X-RAY

Before you schedule your X-Ray, let your physician know if any of following apply to you:

•   Are pregnant or if you are experiencing a late or missed menstrual cycle 
•    Have recently had surgery or experienced trauma or injury
•    Are experiencing pain or other symptoms
•    Are being treated for any other medical problem
•    Have ever been diagnosed with cancer
•    Have had any other diagnostic tests for this condition

 
 

AFTER SCHEDULING AN X-RAY

After you schedule your X-Ray, be sure to fill out your forms on the Patient Portal any time before you arrive at your appointment. 

PATIENT PORTAL >

PATIENT PORTAL INSTRUCTIONS >

Note: Using a Lakeside-assigned SID number to complete your forms while at the facility does not set up a patient account. Please set up your account and complete your forms beforehand to access your medical information in the future.   

THE DAY OF AN X-RAY

On the day of the X-Ray, eat and take medications as usual, unless instructed otherwise. Wear loose clothing without snaps or other metal fasteners. You may, however, be asked to wear a gown during the test.
 
Before entering the X-Ray room, you typically will be asked to remove items that may affect imaging or cause more serious problems, such as:

•    Body piercings

•    Cell phone

•    Coins

•    Cosmetics that contain metal particles, including magnetic eye lashes

•    Credit cards

•    Dentures and other removable dental work

•    Eyeglasses

•    Hairpins

•    Hearing aids

•    Jewelry

•    Keys

•    Pens

•    Pocket knife

•    Tracking devices

•    Underwire bra

•    Watch

•    Wig

 
 

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN HAVING AN X-RAY

Before the X-Ray Begins

The X-ray technologist will position you on the table with the area to be imaged between the machine and the X-Ray plate. Since you have to remain still during the exam, the technologist may use bolsters to help you hold your position and will provide pillows for comfort. Body parts that are not being imaged may be covered with a lead apron to avoid exposure to the rays.  In some cases, examinations are performed in the standing or sitting position. 
 
Typically, you and the technologist are the only ones in the X-Ray room. However, you may have another screened adult with you. The guest will be required to wear a lead apron.

Before beginning, the X-Ray technologist will explain the process, including instructions that you will receive during the X-Ray, and answer any questions you may have. 

During the X-Ray

The technologist will then step behind a protective window and take the picture. Imaging only takes a fraction of a second. You will hear clicks and buzzing during the X-Ray, but you won’t feel anything. If needed, the technologist will reposition you to capture different angles of the same area. 

You may be asked to hold your breath for the picture to avoid blurring. Movement during will distort the images, often rendering them unusable. Imaging might even need to be repeated. 

After the X-Ray

The X-Ray technologist will review the images to see if any additional are required. Once satisfied with the image results, you will be released. 

Some physicians prefer that you bring a CD of the images to your follow up appointment; however, most often, images are electronically sent to the radiologist for review and then the report is sent directly to your referring physician. Patients are asked to make a follow-up appointment with their doctor to discuss the results. 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT X-RAY

What is an X-Ray?

X-Ray (or Radiography) is a fast, painless, noninvasive scan that uses electromagnetic energy beams of radiation to produce detailed images of organs, tissues, bones, and other body structures. X-Rays are the oldest and most frequently used method of medical imaging. Mammograms, CT scans and dental imaging are some other common types of X-Rays.


As the rays pass through the body, different amounts of beams absorb depending on varying densities. The softer the tissue (such as blood, muscle, and fat), the darker gray it appears on the image. The denser the material (such as bones and metal), the whiter it appears. This is how a physician can quickly identify a fracture in a bone. As the beam passes through the fractured area, it appears as a dark line in an otherwise white bone. It is this understanding that allows physicians to quickly identify potential medical conditions. 

 

How long do X-Rays take?

Imaging itself only takes a fraction of a second. However, preparation will take a few minutes before the scan begins and another couple of minutes after the test. The whole process typically takes between 10 and 15 minutes.

Can I move during an X-Ray?

It is important that you do not move while the machine takes the picture, as movement will cause distortion of the images.

Can I get an X-Ray if I am pregnant?

It is not recommended that pregnant patients get an X-Ray. Tell your physician if you are or could be pregnant before scheduling your X-Ray, as they may recommend an Ultrasound instead. 

Can I get an X-Ray with braces or fillings?

Yes; however, depending on the area to be scanned, the metal may distort the images. Discuss this with your physician before making your appointment. 

Is the amount of radiation used in an X-Ray dangerous?
The amount of radiation received from an X-Ray is very small and can be compared to the amount you are naturally exposed to from the environment over the course of a few weeks. In addition, you may be asked to wear a lead apron protect other areas from exposure. 

 

XRAY NEAR ME

17360 Hwy 3 Webster, TX 77598

Flexible hours to meet patient needs!

 

WHAT PEOPLE SAY

ROGER D.

Very well run facility. Very professional. Clean, comfortable and easy peazy. Highly recommend.

AMY JO O.

WOW!! What a wonderful experience I had here at Lakeside! From the appointment scheduling, the timeliness of getting me back to the room for my ultrasound... what a pleasant and positive experience!! Thank you so much!!

GLEN R.

Great place to get imaging done. From IV to patients care, wonderful experience for us.